2017 New Year Render

2017 New Year - work in progress

This image is still very much a work in progress. There is still a lot of things I need to add and improve here. Most notably, I have yet to model some baseboards. I should also create some ceiling trim while I am at it.

Everything was modeled in LightWave; however, the numbers were imported into ZBrush for retopology (done very badly by me). Texturing for the room and the plinths was done in Substance Painter. I quickly realized that I don’t have substances for wall paint or for the wood parquet flooring that I originally envisioned.

Because the numbers do not have UV maps, I used a procedural flakes noise to drive the bump of a LightWave dielectric material. I was aiming for a cut-glass look; none of the green colour has come through though.

More tweaking to do here. Hopefully, I can complete this on time.

ZBrush At Last!

Yesterday, I finally bought ZBrush 4R7.

I have debated this purchase for a long time and decided that a Saturnalia gift to myself this year was reasonable.

One reason for the delay was waiting for an entirely 64-bit release. I had thought the 5R series was finally under development when Pixologic announced earlier this year that there would be a 4R8 first. Not a devastating knock against them, but mildly disappointing given how long 64-bit systems have been available. I started at Microsoft during the shift from 32-bit to 64-bit; so 12+ years on is really a bit much to wait for a change like this.

Virtually every page of the 3D World and 3D Artist magazines features ZBrush work. It certainly is a must-have tool for the industry.

My last objection was training. ZBrush forces some big conceptual thinking changes on a 3D artist. But since I have access to PluralSight, Learn 3D Software and was recommended Michael Pavlovich’s videos, I really have no excuse any more.

I’m looking forward to putting ZBrush into my workflow. And I look forward to sharing the results of my creative efforts with the world.

Getting Caught Up On Stuff

Screaming up again on a month without a post here. Let’s fix that.

I hinted at a sore throat and that sumbitch only just went away in the last couple of days. It was about two weeks of an actual cold and then two weeks of a dry, scratching throat. It kept me coughing and making ahem sounds.

Black Friday and all the days leading up to Christmas Eve are super-busy for work. As a payment processing company, you expect that. The entire team is essentially on-call right now. Officially, I’m on-call next Friday. Fun!

I have finally re-installed all my SevenStyles Photoshop Actions into PS 2017. Brad has been busy creating even more Actions, so I’ll have to buy more in the near future.

In spite of the sore throat, I have recorded more videos about using Headus UV Layout on my YouTube channel. I was asked to do videos about unwrapping a human model; so I undertook the challenge. I used the free MakeHuman tool to get a female model and then set out to create 3 UV Maps rather than the single UV map produced by MakeHuman.

In the very near future, I am also going to take the plunge into the world of ZBrush. There is definitely a lot to learn there.

I am hoping that all of this will take my mind off of the looming disaster of President Trumpycakes.

Adobe Creative Cloud At Last

I was still at Microsoft when they announced plans to dominate the cloud. The chosen mantra was “We’re all in!”

Ugh! I refused to say it. I found it vaguely dirty minded (yes, that borders on hypocritical but I am not a multi-national world-renowned company).

Well, my opinions of the cloud be damned. Years later, it seems that everybody is doing it. I was disappointed when Adobe announced the Creative Cloud and that they would not ship another physical product beyond CS6.

I’ve put it off for years and I am now several versions behind the latest and greatest versions.

So I’m taking the plunge but it wasn’t as easy as it should have been. A little history is in order, please bear with me.

A long time ago, there was a company called Macromedia. They made a web-based piece of software you might have heard of – Flash. They also made a program for creating websites called Dreamweaver. I bought their suite of tools way back in 2001. Then one day, Adobe bought Macromedia.

That wasn’t a bad thing really. It was a good match and brought some incredible tools to Adobe’s other incredible tools.

Then I moved to Texas. When I upgraded to the new Adobe Creative Suite series, I had to prove my registration of the former-Macromedia suite. But the Adobe ID account did not accept my Texas address. It was linked to Canada and could not be changed. For tax reasons is the official excuse.

So I made a new Adobe ID account and used that happily for several Creative Suite upgrades.

Now I am going through that process all over again but in reverse. Adobe support has apparently changed the country on my account (so much for being impossible).

Hopefully I will have the new applications installed before I finally have to get to bed for work tomorrow…

UV Layout Pack Basics

imageI guess I am on a bit of a roll here. After the Copy UVs video, I pushed on a bit further so that I could show the basics of the UV Layout Pack feature.

As impressive as I find the Copy UVs feature, it is the Pack feature that is really what UV Layout is about. After you have flattened all the UV shells, you want to arrange them into a single UV tile – sometimes more than one tile, but I’m getting ahead of myself. You can certainly do this by hand and if your model is simple enough, that’s not a big deal.

In my example, I unwrapped 80 corbels that decorate four castle towers. Manually moving all those shells would be time consuming. The Pack feature not only does that moving for you, it tries to optimize the coverage of the tile space. The more space a shell covers, the more visual detail it has from the texture map.

This was an introduction to packing. There are several features surrounding it. So I’ll make at least one more video about it.

New YouTube Video For UV Layout

Now that I have moved closer to work, I have the time and energy to create more content on my YouTube channel.

imageI am still creating videos about Headus UV Layout. My newest video shows off the Copy UVs feature. As I mention in the video, this feature pretty much makes UV Layout worth the purchase price.

Unwrapping meshes that are the same cloned shape is tedious and time consuming. But Copy UVs allows you to unwrap only one of the clones and then let UV Layout apply all your cuts to the other clones automatically.

You can then chose what UV Layout does with all those flattened shells. It can extend them in one long line along either the U or V directions. Or it can stack all the shells on top of each other; giving you maximal UV space at the cost of making all the meshes have the same textures applied.

I have a few more UV Layout videos planned. Now it won’t be nine months between releases!

First Poser Renders

Pauline - business suit

The above image is not my first render with Poser, but it is the first render that is worth showing off. Unlike past work in Carrara, a lot of the Poser renders will be fully-clothed so that I can share them at work.

The model is called Pauline and I used the business outfit and a preset pose for her. The background is just the empty “construct” default that Poser uses.

I wanted to bring the old models that I bought for Carrara into Poser (since Carrara reads the Poser formats). So I figured that out today and created the render below.

Sexy Victoria

This is the Victoria model with Damaris hair and the Dangerous Mistress dress. I modeled the “sexy” text in LightWave and imported that into Poser. The background is still the “construct.”

The dress actually had a poke-through problem and “hung” down through the letter “E.” So I made two renders; one with the dress and one without it. I merge the two images in Photoshop and used layer masking to correct the poke-through.

I still have much to learn about texturing, lighting and rendering in Poser.

Poser 11 Pro

New weapons added to my 3D arsenal!

I have had my eye on Smith-Micro Poser Pro 11 for some time. That interest has increased as my passion for DAZ Carrara decreased. The renders I created with Carrara actually use the Poser format. I have bought a lot content since I started and didn’t want to waste that investment; but I just cannot stand using Carrara anymore.

DAZ has abandoned Carrara but Smith-Micro maintains and improves their software. So my allegiance has switched.

I also bought some training videos so that I could get up to speed quickly. I cannot wait to start sharing some renders on Flickr. Poser Pro transfers scene assets into LightWave – that could open up some interesting opportunities too.

Further Terrain Tweaks

Terrain test 3It seems that I am spending my commute time during the week thinking about what I can work on in 3D over the weekend. To that end, I am grateful for the three-day weekend.

As mentioned in my previous post, I wanted to add an HDR background so that I could have realistic sky and clouds. That is exactly what I did here – I used LightWave’s Image World feature to display this HDR.

Unfortunately, it is a rather low resolution HDR. It was a free sample from some site that I have long-since forgotten. I should put together a collection of better quality HDR skies; even if it means paying for a few images.

I also tweaked the water texture since it was really bugging me. While still not great, this version makes big strides forward. I used the Fast Fresnel shader so it started reflecting the terrain and sky. I couldn’t get the ripples / wave displacement but there is enough there to distort the reflections.

I may try another terrain creation and another photo-walk this weekend.

Improving The Terrain

terrain test 2A bit later on Sunday afternoon, I managed to get some of the original terrain texturing that I was seeing in Substance Painter. Inside LightWave Layout, I mixed the flow map from World Machine with texture map from Substance Painter.

That really added punch to the crevasses in the rock!

In the previous post, I mentioned adding a brownish coloured fill layer. The Substance Painter mask generator created a happy accident and added very nice strata layers throughout the rest of the terrain. I was very pleased with that!

Several people in the LightWavers Are Everywhere forum on Facebook provided positive feedback. I appreciated that. Mention was made of Andrew Comb’s compound node network that allows LightWave to use the Substance PBR maps. I will definitely have to get that installed and try it out.

I cannot post this without mentioning the terrible looking water plane here. I used a LightWave preset shader for water and did not try to tweak it. Obviously it takes quite a bit away from the scene rather than enhancing it. We’ll see if I cannot improve it.

I’d also like to try out an HDRI sky dome (or LightWave’s Image World) to get a realistic sky with clouds. Fortunately, this is a long weekend – so I’ll have some extra play time!

Terrain Testing

terrain testI have long loved creating terrains in 3D. It was one of the big initial attractors to Carrara for me – terrains were easier to create and texture than they were in POV-Ray. Now that I have moved on into LightWave 2015 and other applications, I want to build a good workflow for terrain building.

I used World Machine 2 and the GeoGlyph plugins to create the height map. The terrain was created in LightWave 2015 using a two kilometer square plane divided into 50×50 segments and subpatched. I saved that transformed plane and opened the object in Substance Painter 1.7.

World Machine created an initial normal map for adding surface details. I used one of the Smart Materials in Substance Painter to get a basic grey rocky surface. I then started painting my own strata layers around the mesa. The texture looked pretty good in Substance Painter but I kept tweaking. I tried making a sandy surface on the flat areas. I then used a mask generator on a fill layer to enhance the strata lines on the rocks around the mesa.

I probably should have stopped while I was ahead. The latest render here was done in LightWave using the Substance Painter texture maps. Unfortunately it looks more like chocolate pudding than the nice rocks and strata!

Well this is all about learning and getting better at creating these models.

[NSFW]–New Carrara Image

This image may not be visible on my Flickr site because I have marked it as “Moderate Safety” for topless female nudity. You will need a Flickr/Yahoo login to see it.

Orianne & KnivesThe recent experimentations with the Victoria model made me want to create a completely gratuitous, Heavy Metal sort of image.

Originally, she was completely free of clothing; but I decidedly a few bit of metallic covering improved the image dramatically. Two of my friends wanted to see bigger breasts than I usually create, so I entertained their request and made the image even more cliché.

When I added the metal bikini, that model could not properly conform to the pose that I had put Victoria into. Most of the bikini pushed-through to be “inside” Victoria’s body. None of the pose morphs could correct it and editing the bikini model directly failed (as it often does for Carrara). My solution was two renders.

The first was the full scene with the poke-through problems on the bikini. The second render was with the Victoria model set invisible. This changed the lighting very slightly but otherwise the two images were the same. I could then use layer masks in Photoshop to correctly reveal the bikini on top of Victoria’s “skin” rather than underneath it.

I have uploaded this image to my WIP album because I am still not entirely happy with it. I want to add some background instead of that flat brown. A realistic sky with some clouds would be good too – probably an HDRI image. Maybe I can add some blood stains to the knife blades and blood spatters to her torso.

New 3D Experiments

Personal MonumentThis started with a very simple idea that I could not get out of my head until I actually tried it.

I used the Chamfer tool on a single corner point of the cube in order to produce the triangular face. Then I used the Mass Round tool from LWCad because LightWave’s Rounder can be finicky.

After that, I exported my model as an OBJ file so that I could do the UV mapping in UV Layout. Happy with that, it was back to LightWave to convert the OBJ back to LWO. Then the fun begins!

I knew that I wanted to use the triangular face to make the model appear to be a monument or an award statuette. I opened the model in Substance Painter to quickly give it a marble texture. I really have yet to take advantage of all the power in this application. Risking the arrogance of it, I made the text of the “award” appear carved into the marble via a normal map. With the texture maps exported, it was back into LightWave for rendering.

The Yebis 2 PBR rendering engine in Substance Painter makes this look much better than what I came up with in LightWave. Some of the more skilled LightWavers have made nodal graphs that use the PBR textures from Painter inside LightWave. I haven’t set that up yet though.

Monument With VictoriaIt has been a long time since I used Carrara. I really dislike it now; but I will save that rant for another time.

What I really wanted to do was add a Victoria 4 model to the “award.” My original vision was going to be something much more sultry and sexy than this. In the end, I opted for something that was safe-for-work viewing.

Carrara has really poor lighting and rendering controls so I am not very happy with this result. I may try again this weekend and perhaps take the sexier route with it. I did change the text of the model in Substance Painter. Unfortunately, Carrara did a really bad job rendering it – there is supposed to be reflective gold material inside the “carved” letters.

Ah well! It was still fun to get back into 3D after a bit of a hiatus.

In related news, I did buy GeoGlyph yesterday. I need to get that installed into World Machine and start playing with terrain modeling again.

Third YouTube Video – Manually Tweaking UV Vertices In UV Layout

UV_Layout_tutorialMy third YouTube video and second tutorial on using Headus UV Layout is now available.

This is a very short video at just over 4 minutes.

The previous video showed the basic unwrapping of primitive meshes and some quick optimization tricks. This video demonstrates how to manually edit the UVs once they are unwrapped because sometimes the algorithm creates overlapping or twisted UVs that can only be fixed by the user.

Future videos in the UV Layout series will likely be short like this one. I’d like to demonstrate some of the useful features like:

  • Straightening edges
  • Packing a UV tile
  • Working with symmetrical meshes and stacking mirrored UV islands
  • Copying UVs to identical geometry (one of the best features in UV Layout!)

Eventually I will also upload animation scenes that I create. For the time being, I am focused on static scenes.

2016: Here I Come!

It has actually been awhile since I did some personal modeling and texturing. Besides the UV Layout tutorial videos, I have been working on a side-project (sorry, not divulging anything just yet).

So yesterday, I figured I would put something together to mark the last day of 2015 and to welcome in 2016.

2016

All of the modeling, texturing and rendering was done in LightWave – did you really expect anything less from me? I did add the smoke effect with Photoshop. There are two spherical lights and three linear lights to add the selective glow to the numbers and reddish hints on the floor and walls.

I think it turned out pretty good for something that was rather quick-and-dirty.

I am looking forward to 2016 and some big life-changes. I’ll be sure to detail them as they happen!

Second YouTube Video – Introduction To Headus UV Layout

Once I started getting serious about 3D modeling, I quickly confronted the problem of UV mapping. Whenever other modelers spoke about it, I felt like I was eavesdropping on an alien conversation. It sounded like English but I had no clue what they were talking about!

It took a lot of coaching and several commercial tutorials before most of the lightbulbs finally clicked on. I’d like to create a YouTube video one day that details this journey.

The short version about UV mapping is that an artist needs to convert all the model’s polygons in 3D space into 2D space. This is called “flattening” or “unwrapping.” Any 3D modeling program worth its salt will have UV mapping features but these vary in quality.

DAZ3D Carrara has horrible UV tools. Only a masochist would want to use this software for anything beyond the most simplistic of meshes. The only good thing that I can say about Carrara’s UV tools is that it can natively export a Photoshop document of the UV mesh.

LightWave is much better but it can still be an uphill climb for a new user and its UV tools have not had any significant updates in a long time. Typically, most LightWave users install the free (but very old) plugin called plg Tools.

imageThen I discovered Headus UV Layout. Using this software is when those lightbulbs really lit up! UV Layout makes editing UVs so fast and easy that an artist can very quickly experiment with different cut locations. Even so, I bought several tutorials in order to get really comfortable with UV Layout.

Now that I am making videos on YouTube, I have decided to show off some of the UV Layout basic tools. This second video is re-recording of a December 5th video.

I have added more tutorial-like instructions to my narration and visual callouts that detail the keyboard commands being used. Regardless of your preferred 3D modeling software, I suggest that you consider using UV Layout to create UV maps for your meshes.

I hope you find this useful. I am looking forward to making more videos that detail more of UV Layout’s features.